Tag Archives: mortgage

Three Things To Do When You Want to Buy a House in the Near Future

Is buying a home in your near future? If so, you will probably be asking to borrow $200,000, $300,000 or even $500,000. That’s a lot of cash!

Certain requirements come along with lending large sums of money. Here’s what you can do now to improve your chances of getting approved.

Buying a House?
Here’s Your “Must Do” List

1. Save money like a squirrel saving nuts for the winter. Stop buying $5 coffee drinks, another pair of shoes (when you already have pairs with no holes in the soles), clothes on sale, restaurant meals, and all those other seemingly small — but honestly — unnecessary items. The underwriter wants to see your bank balance increasing every month to show that you will be able to afford a house payment that’s more than your rent.

2. Say no to offers to open new credit. Getting a new credit card to save 10 percent on your purchase today will lower your credit score. It is not worth the savings! You want top tier credit so that you qualify for the lowest interest rate on your mortgage. It makes no sense to save $20 today and pay $1,000s more in interest on your house payment.

3. Be happy driving your old car. One of the biggest mistakes people make is adding an auto loan to their debt ratio. The proper way to prioritize is house first. Everything else is secondary and must wait until after you are in your new home.

THE SACRIFICE YOU MAKE TODAY WILL BE WORTH IT WHEN YOUR REALTOR HANDS YOU THE KEYS.

Do your friends a favor and pass on this information to them. As always, thank you for reading my posts.

 

Why are Interest Rates Going Up?

Mortgage interest rates have been trending upward all year. So, what’s ahead, and why?

The Federal Reserve Board will be meeting at the end of next month, and right now, the markets are banking on another .25% increase, according to Origination Pro, a publication for mortgage loan officers.

“Again?” Yes, as I type this, I have received an alert that rates are going up midday and to lock now if you’re floating your rate.

“Why?” Because good economic news leads to higher rates.

  • The number of new jobs for August was higher than expected.
  • More individuals are re-entering the workforce.
  • Wages have increased, on average.
  • Consumers are spending more money, putting cash into the marketplace.
  • Consumer confidence is soaring.

Chairman Jerome H. Powell said in his speech on changing markets and monetary policy:

“Over the course of a long recovery, the U.S. economy has strengthened substantially. The unemployment rate has declined steadily for almost nine years, and at 3.9 percent, is now near a 20-year low… With solid household and business confidence, healthy levels of job creation, rising incomes, and fiscal stimulus arriving, there is good reason to expect that this strong performance will continue.”

Read the full speech here.

Time for Action!

If you have an Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM), consider refinancing into a fixed rate, if you plan to keep the house for a substantial amount of time.

If you want to shorten your mortgage term to 20 years or 15 years, do so now before rates go higher.

If you want to buy a home and stop paying rent, don’t procrastinate. Get pre-approved for financing and contact a local real estate agent.

If you are working on your credit, ask your loan officer if you can qualify for an FHA loan now while your credit is improving.

As always, thank you for reading and recommending my books and services.

 

Seven Credit Mistakes to Avoid When Buying a Home

Attention Home Buyers! Do not expect your loan to close smoothly if you make one of these money moves during your loan process (or right before your loan process). In fact, it could actually cause your approval to slip and fall into a denial.

“Can they do that? I have my approval in writing?” you may ask.

Absolutely. The lender can withdraw your loan approval — even after giving you a written commitment — if they perceive that you have become a greater credit risk.

Seven Mistakes to Avoid

1) Don’t apply for new credit of any kind.

2) Don’t pay off collections or charge-offs during the loan process.

3) Don’t close credit accounts, not even old ones you haven’t used in a long time.

4) Don’t increase the balance on your credit cards, which also means don’t buy furniture, appliances, or anything else for your upcoming new home until after closing.

5) Don’t consolidate your debt onto one or two cards.

6) Don’t co-sign on a loan for anyone.

7) Don’t change your name during the loan process.

If you need clarification about any of the seven, let me know. But please, take this advice as “set in stone” unless your loan officer has specifically given you an exception, because the last thing you need is more stress during your loan closing.

 

Can You Pass This Two-Question Money Quiz?

Assume you rent an apartment and drive an old car, and you would like to upgrade your life style.

Question #1: If you have to choose between buying a house or a truck, which do you choose?

Question #2: Assuming you can afford to buy both a house and a truck, which one do you buy first?

Before we look at the answers…

A True Story: A young gentleman finished his credit repair work and raised his credit score to 640. This qualified him for the FHA Elite loan for home buyers.

He felt great! He was excited.

So he ran straight to the auto dealership and bought himself a brand  new 2018 Chevy Tahoe. (MSRP $47,500)

Then he drove home and called his mortgage loan officer. “I’d like to get approved to buy my first home,” he announced.

So the loan officer took the application and ordered his credit report–and bam!–he got declined.

“Why?” he asked, totally stunned.

His new truck purchase dropped his score from 640 to 565. Too low for any of the first-time home buyer programs! Too low for the FHA 3.5% down payment program!

Not only that, but with a hefty new payment, he no longer qualified for the purchase price he needed anyway.

Maybe the Tahoe is so luxurious, he’ll be happy living in it. (Bad joke, sorry.)

Let’s See How You Did on the Quiz

Answer #1: Buy the house. Real estate is going up in value. You can increase your personal wealth by owning a home. A vehicle goes down in value the moment it become “used.”

Answer #2: Buy the house first, always, even if your credit score is 800. A higher score and a lower debt ratio will qualify you for better, cheaper financing.

The house is more important than the truck. Buy your most important item first (not the easiest to get).

I welcome your comments. Thank you for sharing this with others and on social media. Too many people are shooting themselves in the financial foot by purchasing a vehicle before the home.

 

 

Best Place For Getting a Mortgage Home Loan

Bank, credit union, broker, or direct lender? What is the difference, and where is the best place to get a home loan? Having worked for a national bank, a broker, direct lender, and having interviewed with a credit union, I can provide some insider information. Here are some facts most consumers don’t know.

BROKER

A mortgage broker shops wholesale lenders to find the best option for your loan. Think of a travel agent shopping airlines for you. Some people assume that using a broker costs more–a middleman fee–but that is not true. Because brokers go to wholesale lenders, they can often find you cheaper financing than if you go directly to your retail bank.

Brokers are required by federal law to obtain a loan officer license from the National Mortgage Licensing System. This means they must attend classes in lending law and requirements, then pass a rigorous test that about 30 percent of applicants fail. They must also be fingerprinted and pass a background investigation and credit investigation.

DIRECT LENDER

A direct lender uses their own money to lend rather than broker out to wholesale. Using in-house underwriting is sometimes an advantage for closing faster and for getting a more streamlined approval.

Loan officers working for a direct lender must obtain their NMLS license, passing all tests and background checks, the same as for a broker.

BANK

A bank also uses their own money, but typically, they do not close faster or easier. In fact, the large banks are usually slower and have tougher underwriting requirements to pass. It is not unusual to be asked for more documentation in the 11th hour, requiring getting an extension on the loan.

Loan officers at a bank do not have to get a NMLS license. They do not have to pass an NMLS test. They do not get fingerprinted or have a background investigation. I personally know of a case where a woman who was under investigation for loan fraud waltzed into a big bank and was promptly hired.

CREDIT UNION

Everything above that applies to a bank also applies to a credit union. Some credit unions have excellent pricing and service, but others have horrific service. One popular West Coast credit union that I interviewed with has a bad business model. They have application takers in their branches, then those applications get passed on to a regional loan officer who handles dozens of branches. So the person you met with in the branch is not your actual loan officer, nor does that person have any training in mortgage loans. I’m sorry, but that is not my standard of service when it comes to something as monumental as buying a house.

FULL SERVICE MORTGAGE LENDER

I’ve saved the best for last. A full service mortgage lender has their own money to lend (like a direct lender) but can also broker out when needed. This gives the most options and the most flexibility.

Loan officers must meet all NMLS licensing requirements and pass all investigations and checks.

Personally, I work for a full service mortgage lender, and I like having more choices for my clients. I am state licensed in WA and CA, so I have taken state courses for both states, and have passed state tests as well as the big national test. I was fingerprinted twice and have passed all background tests, including an annual credit investigation.

I welcome your questions and comments. Thank you for stopping by my blog today. By the way, my new expanded 2017 version of Repair Your Credit Like the Pros has been released and is available here.

 

Mortgage Interest Rates Rising Rapidly

I want to make everyone aware that mortgage interest rates have been and are continuing tointerest-rates rise rapidly. The rate you were quoted last week no longer applies. In fact, the rate you were quoted yesterday no longer applies. Your interest rate is not secure until it is locked.

To lock your rate, ask your loan officer to do so. For a matter this important, make the phone call. Do not rely on an email which can be overlooked or missed.

A rate lock is tied to a specific property address, loan amount, and other terms. There is a “Lock and Shop” program where you can lock in your rate before you have an address; however, that is riskier to the lender, so the interest rate is higher, which pretty much defeats the goal in most cases.

If you want a lower monthly mortgage payment, I strongly suggest you resist the temptation to wait until after the New Year to find a house. Get with your Realtor now and make an offer. Then the minute you have a mutually signed Purchase Agreement, send a copy to your loan officer so that you can lock in your interest rate.

If you know someone who is thinking of buying a home in the near future, please pass on this vital information, because procrastination will result in a higher payment.

Thank you for reading my blog posts and for helping pass on intelligence through social media.

 

Buying a Home? What to Do First, Second, Third

The best time to get a map is before you walk into the forest. Likewise, the best time to get your mortgage map is before checklistyou go shopping for a house. If you work the system backwards, you are setting yourself up for possible disaster.

Here is a simple checklist for home buyers:

Notice that you take care of the financing first, then the house shopping second.

1. Choose a lender by asking for a cost estimate worksheet.

This is your very first step. Not, go house hunting. Not, get pre-approved. And certainly not, make an offer! Why? Because, you don’t want to shop for houses that you are not qualified to buy, so you take care of your financing first. And, you don’t want multiple lenders pulling your credit report, so you choose your lender first. The way to choose a lender is to review the estimate worksheet and speak with the loan officer to ascertain how they answer your questions. (What to ask a loan officer is a topic for my next blog post.)

2. Get pre-approved for financing.

Now that you have your trusted loan officer, you are ready to have your credit report checked, provide your financial documents, and receive your official pre-approval letter.

3. Choose a Realtor.

I recommend working with a certified Realtor rather than a real estate agent, because a certified Realtor has gone through extra training and is held to a higher standard of ethics and work practices.

4. Go house hunting and make your offer.

Presenting the offer is last on the list, not first. Don’t waste your time, the Realtors’ time, the seller’s time, and setCover.3D.Mortgage Rip-Offs yourself up for trouble by jumping ahead.

Your Realtor will guide you through the offer and negotiations. Your loan officer will guide you through the financing.

Thank you for stopping by my blog. Feel free to share this simple list via social media and with others who are thinking of buying a home. You would not believe the horror stories I’ve heard from people who have run headfirst into disaster by signing purchase contracts before they had their financing approved. I hope to save more people from that situation!

 

 

Using Marijuana Money to Buy a House

Blog post1Several people have asked me if they can get a mortgage using income from the legal sale of marijuana.

One person owns a state licensed shop that sells cannabis and related products. His shop does not have the 24 months required for self-employment, but he owned another business previously, so he can claim self-employment for more than two years.

Anther person is a W2 employee who works tending the marijuana plants. Prior to his current position, he worked for a nursery tending many types of flowers and plants. He says he has a history doing the same type of work, and the company he works for is legal in Washington state.

Can the shop owner and the employee qualify for a mortgage based on their incomes?

To get the answer straight from the source that provides money to banks and mortgage lenders for conventional loans, I spoke directly with Fannie Mae representative Deborah DeGarmo on June 21. (A transcript of our conversation was recorded at Fannie Mae and is available for underwriters who call and request the information, she said.)

The W2 employee who works for a legal business that sells marijuana can qualify for a mortgage just like any other W2 employee.

The business owner of a shop that sells marijuana cannot qualify for a mortgage based on that income, because that type of business is not yet federally recognized as legal.

So there you have it, from Fannie Mae. To qualify for a conventional loan, you need a down payment of at least 3% (which can be from an acceptable down payment assistance program). If you are in WA or CA, I am licensed in those states.

 

Map source: psu.edu

Three Common Mistakes Home Buyers Make Without Realizing Their Error Until It is Too Late

If you plan to buy a house or refinance in the foreseeable future, this is important information. To avoid stress, grief, more paperwork, and a possible loan delay — or even a denial — don’t make these common mistakes.

Three Mistakes Home Buyers Make (Also applies to people refinancing)

  1. Don’t move money around!
    This is not the time to transfer funds from one account to another. Keep your money where it is until after your loan closes. If you get angry at your bank and want nothing more than to say, “I’m outta here!” I don’t blame you a bit for feeling that way. But please, keep your patience and save that action for later. If you close one account and open another, you are in for a hassle in the underwriting department. Yes, you can still get your loan, but why set yourself up for more paperwork and letters of explanation? If a family member is giving you a gift toward the down payment, the same advice applies. Have them keep the funds in their own account until you receive instructions from your loan officer. Most lenders will ask the family member to wire funds directly to the closing agent at the time of signing.
  2. Don’t open new credit! Don’t buy a car!
    No exceptions. Do not purchase new appliances or new furniture until after closing. Do not open a new credit card to get the instant discount. And whatever you do, don’t you dare buy a new automobile, truck, or SUV. Taking on any new debt could cause your loan approval to turn into a denial — even if you have signed the loan note and closing disclosures. Until your loan is officially funded and closed, the lender can still deny your loan.
  3. Don’t close out your good credit!
    This is not the time to decide you have too much open credit and start shutting down your credit cards. Doing so could lower your credit score for two reasons. First, you can lose the positive points that the on-time credit card was awarding you. Second, you will be changing your percentage of total credit usage-to-available credit, and this has the potential of lowering your score. Even though the lender has already pulled your credit report and approved it, most lenders will do another soft pull right before closing. You don’t need to risk lowering your score and therefore risk your interest rate or approval.

Thank you for stopping by my blog. Feel free to subscribe. I post tips on mortgage and credit about once a week. If you have a topic you’d like to see, please email me here.

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March Madness: Higher Home Prices Coming Soon

bidding-war-273x300Mid-March, just about the time of the NCAA basketball tournament, home sales skyrocket to the highest of the year. That’s what happened last year and in the years before. There is no reason to think 2016 will be any different. Savvy sellers who have been waiting like patient cats suddenly list their homes for sale. Buyers, giddy with excitement at finally seeing more choices on the market, race to outbid one another.

I saw it with my own eyes right on my little cul-de-sac. Three home owners placed their properties for sale, and all three sold above asking price inside of a week.

Typically, the market continues at a brisk pace (although not as brisk as those two mad weeks in mid-March) until mid-August when the heat finally drives buyers off the streets and down to the beach, and families with children turn their attention to back-to-school.

If you are in the market to buy a home and want to save tens of thousands of dollars, you might want to get your Purchase Agreement signed around now before the spring frenzy begins. Whatever you do, make sure you have a written pre-approval letter in hand before you go out house shopping. Without that, no seller will take you seriously. If you are buying in California or Washington, I am state licensed in those states and am happy to help you.

Contact me here or send me an email at cwarren @ envoymortgage.com.

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